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Passwd.team review

Share passwords using G Suite groups

Passwd.team review
(Image: © Passwd.team)

Our Verdict

Passwd.team is a convenient password management solution for teams and small businesses that already use G Suite. However, it has some serious security issues that make us hesitant to recommend it.

For

  • Inexpensive for large organizations
  • Integrates with Google G Suite

Against

  • High risk in case of compromised account
  • No browser extensions

Passwd.team is an interesting player in the world of password managers. This software is designed to help you share passwords within organizations and small teams while still maintaining access management controls. What’s unique about this Passwd.team is that the company doesn’t store your passwords itself. Rather, your passwords are stored in a database in Google’s cloud.

So, is Passwd.team the best password manager for your business? In our Passwd.team review, we’ll explore everything this software has to offer and evaluate whether it’s secure.

Passwd.team review

Passwd.team offers monthly and annual pricing options (Image credit: Passwd.team)

Plans and pricing

Passwd.team charges $30 per month or $180 per year for an entire organization, no matter whether you have five users or 500. Basic support is free, but if you want 24/7 priority support you’ll need to contact the company for a quote. Passwd.team offers a free demo, but you can’t actually try out the software within your own organization without signing up for a subscription.

Keep in mind that in order to use Passwd.team, you’ll need a Google Cloud or G Suite plan as well.

Features

Passwd.team works, at least for individual end-users, like any other password manager. You can save an unlimited number of records and they can be any type of text string, such as credit card or bank account numbers. When creating new accounts, you have access to a random password generator.

What makes Passwd.team unique is that your passwords aren’t stored either on your computer or on Passwd.team’s servers. Rather, they’re stored in your own Google Cloud space. Essentially, that means that, for any G Suite users, your encrypted password database is located in Google Drive.

Passwd.team review

Manage access to your passwords using groups within G Suite (Image credit: Passwd.team)

This is an interesting configuration since it enables Passwd.team to integrate tightly with Google’s G Suite capabilities. For example, when you want to share passwords, you can do so by offering access to specific user groups that you create within G Suite. If you want to add or remove users from a group, you’ll do so in G Suite rather than in Passwd.team. The password will then show up in those users’ Passwd.team accounts, but the original record will still live in your individual Google Cloud space. You can revoke access at any time, although there isn’t a mechanism to prevent other users from copying your shared passwords as long as they have access.

Notably, Passwd.team offers a mechanism to whitelist individual users who aren’t in a G Suite group with shared access to a specific password. There isn’t a way to blacklist individual users, however, so giving access to a group is an all-or-none process.

Passwd.team review

Passwd.team enables you to add tags to your records for easier searching (Image credit: Passwd.team )

Interface and in use

Passwd.team is pretty simple to use. Your passwords are accessible through a web interface, which you can also use to create new records. Records can be tagged and searched, which makes it easier to find passwords as your database expands. One helpful organizational trick is to create separate tags for passwords you create and passwords shared with you by others. Alternatively, you can create tags for passwords shared within different G Suite groups.

The biggest issue we had with the Passwd.team interface is that since user groups are managed within G Suite, there’s a lot of navigating back and forth between Google and Passwd.team. We also noticed that Passwd.team won’t populate your database with logos for popular online platforms, which makes it a little bit harder to browse your accounts.

Passwd.team review

Passwd.team offers support via email and Facebook Messenger (Image credit: Passwd.team)

Support

Passwd.team offers support by email and Facebook Messenger during US Eastern business hours. The company’s website has an FAQs page, but there aren’t any other support resources or tutorials available.

Security

Passwd.team claims to be completely secure because you log into the software with your Google account (which supports two-factor authentication) and because your encrypted data is stored on Google’s servers. However, we still have some serious concerns about Passwd.team’s security.

Passwd.team review

You log into your Passwd.team account using your Google account credentials (Image credit: Passwd.team)

First, Passwd.team doesn’t have an auto-fill feature or browser extensions. Rather, the platform encourages you to use your browser’s existing auto-fill feature. That’s less than ideal since it means that your passwords will be stored in your browser in addition to Google Cloud. We trust Google Cloud to be secure, but not every browser’s built-in password manager is as reliable when it comes to security. That’s doubly true if you tend to put off browser updates.

Second, Passwd.team’s group sharing features present some very inherent security risks. If the Google account of one user in a group is compromised, then a bad actor can access not only that user’s passwords but all the passwords that have been shared with them

Passwd.team is built with flexible groups so that individuals only get access to the passwords they need, when they need them. But the fact is that most organizations end up with password access creep over time. Worse, if passwords are stored in that user’s browser, passwords that the user no longer has access to are still accessible both to them and to a potential hacker.

The competition

Businesses that need a solution for sharing passwords across teams should look to LastPass or Dashlane

Both platforms offer team plans for business, although they can be expensive since they charge per user. LastPass and Dashlane each offer group sharing and access management using a vault system. Importantly, they offer their own browser extensions that are more trustworthy than the password managers built into common browsers.

Final verdict

Passwd.team makes it very easy to share passwords within small groups across organizations. The software can be very cost effective for larger businesses that already use G Suite since it charges a single rate no matter the size of your organization. However, we have serious concerns about the security of Passwd.team. Think carefully about how the software’s flaws could impact your business’s online security before using this team password manager.