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This vital Windows 10 tool just got a highly anticipated upgrade

Command Line
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Microsoft has rolled out a new version of Windows Terminal, its open source command line tool for Windows 10.

As per the Github entry, Windows Terminal 1.7 delivers a handful of welcome improvements, including a new interface that lets users tweak their settings without having to meddle with configuration files. 

The new menu includes options for changing the default profile, as well as the appearance and behavior of the application at launch, and can be accessed via dropdown menu or keyboard shortcut (Ctrl + ,).

As is usual, version 1.7 also comes with a range of minor bug fixes, which should make for a more seamless experience.

Windows Terminal update

Unlike rival services, Windows Terminal allows users to create multiple tabs for different console applications (e.g. Command Prompt or PowerShell). It also offers a greater level of customizability where keyboard shortcuts, backgrounds and other options are concerned.

The arrival of the settings UI should allow users to maximize the value of this additional configurability, by making these extra features more readily available.

Beyond the new stable build, however, Microsoft has also published a preview of Windows Terminal 1.8, which brings with it a host of small but handy upgrades.

In version 1.8, users will be able to Shift + Click to open a profile in a new window, expanding upon existing functionality that lets users open a profile in a new pane with Alt + Click. Microsoft has also introduced the ability to name individual terminal windows, which will make juggling multiple profiles less of a hassle.

According to a Microsoft blog post, the preview build also expands the library of command line arguments, “allowing you to specify if you’d like a certain profile to suppress application title changes upon launch when using the command line.”

Both Windows Terminal 1.7 and the 1.8 preview can be installed via Microsoft Store or Github. A preinstallation kit is also available for administrators that might want to package the application with new Windows 10 installations.

Via BleepingComputer

Joel Khalili

Joel Khalili is a Staff Writer working across both TechRadar Pro and ITProPortal. He's interested in receiving pitches around cybersecurity, data privacy, cloud, storage, internet infrastructure, mobile, 5G and blockchain.