Skip to main content

This stunning 49-inch business monitor has 3 features all displays should have

(Image credit: Philips)

Today, you can get a 50-inch 4K television these days for under $200 that can double as a computer monitor seamlessly. So, to pay more than five times that amount for a smaller display might seem counterproductive.

However, the Philips Brilliance 499P9H is unlike any other monitor on the market and it's on sale at Amazon for just $1,065, with a four-year warranty (roughly £870/AU$1900).

Aimed squarely at a business audience, the Brilliance 499P9H is packed with features, but will require a lot of deskspace. After all, this is a 49-inch display with a screen resolution of 5120x1440 pixels (or dual QHD) and a 32:9 aspect ratio - one that's not only very wide, but highly curved as well.

Found a better deal?

Have you managed to get hold of a cheaper product with equivalent specifications? Let us know and we'll tip our hat to you.

There's also more to this monitor than meets the eye; look closely at the top and you'll find a pop up webcam that allows you to sign in via Windows Hello facial recognition. Business users will also appreciate the inclusion of a KVM, which allows allows two computers to be connected to the same display.

It also features a built-in USB Type-C docking station that can provide up to 65W of power - enough for devices such as the Dell XPS 13 but probably not for the MacBook Pro 16  - and boasts a staggering 10 ports in total.

Two built-in speakers should provide a fair audio experience and there’s even a microphone for the purposes of video conferencing.

Note, while Amazon ships globally, you may be levied additional tax or shipping fees depending on your location.

Desire Athow

Managing Editor, TechRadar Pro

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology in a career spanning four decades. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global techfests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. He has an affinity for anything hardware and staunchly refuses to stop writing reviews of obscure products or cover niche B2B software-as-a-service providers.