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Samsung The Terrace is the first outdoor TV to get a visibility award

Samsung The Terrace
(Image credit: Samsung)

Samsung Electronics has broken new ground with The Terrace, its line of TVs specifically designed for outdoor use, which have now become the first devices to be verified for outdoor visibility performance under strict measurement conditions.

Reported by Samsung’s own global newsroom site, the verification comes from Underwriters Laboratories (UL), a trusted independent safety science group that operates worldwide.

According to Samsung, The Terrace went through a rigorous testing phase to earn the verification, stating: “a product must undergo several rounds of rigorous testing, in which peak brightness of over 3,000 ~ 4,000 nits, a higher contrast ratio of over 1,000:1, and color volume greater than 80 percent should be altogether achieved under over 10,000 LUX condition.” Lux being the unit that measures the amount of light falling on a certain surface area.

A bright future for TVs?

The Terrace TV first appeared on our radar last year, where it was making waves as Samsung’s first weatherproof QLED TV. This was backed up by its IP55 rating, noting that the TV is strongly resistant to dust and rainwater. Paired with UL’s outdoor visibility verification, The Terrace has the potential to find itself on many more TV enthusiasts’ wishlists in the near future.

While Samsung’s The Terrace is enjoying an industry-first verification, it’s not the first time a TV has received an eye safety certification from UL. A few months ago, UL awarded LG’s OLED TVs a ‘discomfort glare free’ certification, after tests confirmed the TVs emit no glare, making them a great choice for users with sensitive eyes.

It’s very likely that we’ll start to see more certifications handed out for cutting edge TVs in the near future, especially as they get both larger and brighter with features like HDR10+ and the growing presence of 8K resolution. As such, it’s easy to see manufacturers tailoring their new TVs to meet eye safety requirements to keep complaints low and sales up among accessibility-conscious consumers.