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Epic Games is essentially paying you to download Rocket League

Rocket League
(Image credit: Psyonix)

Rocket League has now gone free-to-play, and those who download the game from the Epic Games Store before October 23 can earn a $10 / £10 voucher. The voucher can only be used on qualifying games and add-ons priced at $14.99 / £15.99, and expires on November 1, 2020. You literally have nothing to lose, then, other than some hard drive space.

The vehicular-based soccer game was snapped up by Epic Games, and is no longer available to purchase on Steam. The game will continue to be fully supported for Steam owners, though, and cross-platform progression support has been enabled, allowing users to link their Epic Games Account across Xbox One, PS4, Nintendo Switch and Steam. 

Rocket League is currently holding a Llama-Rama event that allows players to unlock rewards for both Rocket League and Epic’s other popular online multiplayer game, Fortnite. A Battle Bus is also coming to Rocket League as a new playable vehicle.

Drive of your life

Rocket League was extremely well-received when it debuted as a PlayStation Plus title way back in 2015 and continues to be popular with players on all platforms. Now that Rocket League has gone free-to-play, PlayStation 4 and Nintendo Switch owners won’t need either a PS Plus or a Nintendo Switch Online membership to play. Xbox One users will still require Xbox Live Gold, however.

The Epic Games Store continues to give away free games each and every week. This week's title is RollerCoaster Tycoon 3: Complete Edition. 

Adam Vjestica

Adam is a Senior Gaming Writer at TechRadar. A law graduate with an exceptional track record in content creation and online engagement, Adam has penned scintillating copy for various technology sites, and also established his very own award-nominated video games website. He’s previously worked at Nintendo of Europe as a Content Marketing Editor and once played Halo 5: Guardians for over 51 hours for charity. (He’s still recovering to this day.)