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Intel continues to take Apple break-up badly with launch of ‘I’m a Mac’ ad campaign

Intel
(Image credit: Shutterstock / monticello)

Intel is once again taking aim at Apple’s M1-powered MacBook lineup to promote laptops powered by its rival CPUs. 

In its latest Apple-bashing ad campaign, Intel has hired Justin Long, well-known for his role in Apple's 'Get a Mac' adverts from the early 2000s, to poke fun at the company's MacBooks. 

The series of ads, called 'Justin Gets Real', have been posted to Intel's YouTube channel, and each mocks a specific MacBook feature from the controversial Touch Bar and “gray and grayer” color options to the lack of multiple monitor support on M1-powered laptops. 

Another pokes fun at the fact that “no one really games on a Mac”, with Intel - and Justin - also mocking Apple’s lack of touchscreen and 2-in-1 MacBook options, which means you need to buy a tablet, keyboard, stylus to match what's available on rival Intel-powered laptops. 

The campaign, which comes months after Apple announced plans to ditch Intel CPUs in MacBooks in favour of its own chips, echoes a similar Twitter marketing campaign Intel launched earlier this year that highlighted the supposed shortcomings of Apple’s ARM-based M1 processors. 

Intel has also previously posted a series of cherry-picked benchmarks designed to show that its 11th-generation processors perform better than the M1. 

However, Apple columnist Jason Snell called out the benchmarks as "M1-unfriendly" in commentary shared on his website Six Colors, suggesting Intel used inconsistent test platforms and and omitted data. 

"Today's M1 processor is a low-end chip for low-end systems, so Intel only has a small window to compare itself favorably to these systems before higher-end Apple silicon Macs ship and make its job that much harder," he added.

It’s worth noting that Apple still offers some Intel-powered Macs, including a 13-inch MacBook Pro and Mac mini. However, the firm last year said that it would transition all of its devices to M1 chips over the next couple of years - and it doesn’t look like Intel is taking the break-up all that well.  

Via: The Verge