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The PS5 controller makes you 'immediately forget' the DualShock 4, says Bethesda

The Elder Scrolls 5: Skyrim (Image credit: Bethesda)

At least one voice at Bethesda has come out in favor of the new PS5 controller design, with Pete Hines – senior vice president of global marketing and comms at the gaming developer – tweeting about his experience trying out the 'DualSense' controller.

One thing is clear: the PS5 controller's advanced adaptive triggers and haptic feedback should make a difference compared to today's PS4 controllers.

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When asked whether the DualSense controller feels "different" to the previous iteration – the DualShock 4 – Hines replied that, "You sort of immediately forget about a PS4 controller. I went back and forth between them and you immediately just want to use the PS5."

The future is haptic

These comments bode well for those thinking about buying into the next-gen PS5 console – as well as those hoping that the next fleet of games from Bethesda will make the most of the new hardware and its more more advanced inputs.

We're still waiting on release dates for both Elder Scrolls 6 and the new sci-fi RPG Starfield that got announced at E3 2018. We're yet to find out Bethesda's future plans for the Fallout franchise, too, after a botched Fallout 76 launch that has killed off a lot of appetite for the once-great post-apocalyptic series.

Adaptive triggers, for one, allow for more nuanced gripping or firing mechanics – such as how tightly an avatar character clenches their fist or how firmly they hold down a trigger – while improved haptic feedback will help you to feel the impact of both enemy fire and the environment around you.

We've only got to look at the new controller ourselves – with some mixed reactions even within the TechRadar team – but we'll be sure to give a firmer judgement when we get to the PS5 launch.

Via DualShockers

Henry St Leger

Henry is TechRadar's News & Features Editor, covering the stories of the day with verve, moxie, and aplomb. He's spent the past three years reporting on TVs, projectors and smart speakers as well as gaming and VR – including a stint as the website's Home Cinema Editor – and has been interviewed live on both BBC World News and Channel News Asia, discussing the future of transport and 4K resolution televisions respectively. As a graduate of English Literature and persistent theatre enthusiast, he'll usually be found forcing Shakespeare puns into his technology articles, which he thinks is what the Bard would have wanted. Bylines include Edge, T3, and Little White Lies.