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One of the most annoying Microsoft Edge features has finally been fixed

Microsoft Edge phone PC logo
(Image credit: Shutterstock.com / DANIEL CONSTANTE)

One of the most irritating parts of Microsoft Edge is finally being fixed after the development team apparently gave in to user complaints.

Much of the Chromium-based Edge browser had been redesigned in recent months, including the context menus that appear when a user right-clicks somewhere in a window.

However, users have long complained that this menu is far too large when it appears, and is cluttered with a huge list of options that are neither useful or helpful at all.

Microsoft Edge menus

Now, Microsoft appears to have finally addressed the complaints, with the company saying that a fix is on the way.

As spotted by WindowsLatest (opens in new tab), the next version of Microsoft Edge Canary looks to reduce the size of the menu, hopefully appeasing users across the board.

The company acknowledged that the context menus were too large and unwieldy, and surprisingly lacked any way to customize its appearance.

“We hear that both the right-click context and the … menus are too long, too wide, and don’t offer any ways to customize," Microsoft wrote in a feedback summary post (opens in new tab). "You may have seen some ways we are attempting to address these pain points in our Canary channel”.

The change should be rolling out in the next version of the Microsoft Edge Canary build any day now, with users encouraged to try it out and give the company their feedback.

The fix is the latest in a series of recent updates and upgrades released by Microsoft Edge in recent weeks as the company looks to continue making the browser easy to use for customers everywhere.

Such changes may be desperately needed, with recent figures suggesting that Microsoft Edge has either lost or failed to gain market share (opens in new tab) in the browser space in four of the last six months.

The latest Statcounter figures claim that Edge holds a 4.05% share of the market across both desktop and mobile platforms - equating to an estimated 200 million users - a long way shy of both Google Chrome (64.34%) and Apple’s Safari (19.16%), but ahead of Firefox (3.41%).

Mike Moore is Deputy Editor at TechRadar Pro. He has worked as a B2B and B2C tech journalist for nearly a decade, including at one of the UK's leading national newspapers and fellow Future title ITProPortal, and when he's not keeping track of all the latest enterprise and workplace trends, can most likely be found watching, following or taking part in some kind of sport.