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Google Drive is finally opening up to your least favourite workplace app

Google Drive
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Tracking down the details of that important team or board meeting in Google Drive should soon be a whole lot easier thanks to a new update.

The cloud storage platform has unveiled details of an upgrade that it says will allow users to easily search for Google Meet content in Google Drive.

This includes the ability to hunt down the likes of meeting recordings, chat transcripts or even the results of polls and questions asked during the call.

Google Drive and Meet

In a Google Workspace blog post update announcing the news, the company outlined how users can now enter the command app:”Google Meet” to easily find and organize content from the platform within Google Drive.

It could also help find attendance reports, meeting notes created in Google Calendar, or even transcripts of an entire meeting.

Users can search for the latter using keywords contained within the transcript, as well as finding Meet videos based on what folders they may be in (such as My Drive), or Meet recordings based on the date they were recorded.

"We hope this update makes it easier for you to quickly and efficiently find files related to Meet events in Drive," Google said (opens in new tab).

The feature is already rolling out now, with all Google Workspace customers, as well as legacy G Suite Basic and Business customers able to access it, as well as users with personal Google accounts.

The update is the latest improvement for Google Drive rolled out in the last few weeks as the company looks to ensure its service stays ahead of the competition.

This includes the expansion of the “search chips” function, mentioned above, which allows users to locate specific files more easily using various different parameters, including file type, labels and last modified date.

Google also recently announced a new policy which will aim to restrict access to files deemed to be in violation of the company’s policies, meaning they can no longer be shared with other people, and access will be withdrawn from everyone but the owner.

Mike Moore is Deputy Editor at TechRadar Pro. He has worked as a B2B and B2C tech journalist for nearly a decade, including at one of the UK's leading national newspapers and fellow Future title ITProPortal, and when he's not keeping track of all the latest enterprise and workplace trends, can most likely be found watching, following or taking part in some kind of sport.