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The best soundbars in the UAE and Saudi for TV shows, movies and music in 2022

PRICE
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
the best soundbars of 2021
(Image credit: TechRadar)

Finding the best soundbar in the UAE, Saudi Arabia or the rest of the GCC can be a complicated process. That's why we're here. Whether you want to create the ultimate home theater system of your dreams, or you simply want a more reliable and inexpensive audio source to pair up with your TV, we can help you find the soundbar that's ideal for you.

We think that soundbars are essential upgrades to modern TVs because most of the best TVs you can buy today are very slim. That means there's only so much room for speakers, and the audio quality often lacks punch as a result. Subwoofers bring that punch back and more. 

Even the best Samsung TV and best LG TVs could do with an external soundbar to provide you with better audio performance, and when it comes to the best budget TVs, you'll definitely need the extra oomph of a soundbar: audio tends to be a bit of an afterthought at the more affordable end of the market. 

We've tested stacks of soundbars to put together this guide to the very best ones. We haven't just gone for the biggest or most expensive options: we've looked at all budgets and specifications from high-end models with the latest Dolby Atmos immersive sound to more affordable plug-in-and-go solutions. 

If you're not sure how to set up your soundbar, check out how to set up TV speakers and soundbars: we asked the pros how to get the best results. 

It's worth noting that soundbars aren't the only option. Take a look at our pick of the best surround sound systems for a truly cinematic audio experience, or check out the best Dolby Atmos speakers and soundbars instead.

Best soundbars 2022: the list

The Sonos arc in white mounted on a wall beneath a TV

(Image credit: Sonos)
The best soundbar you can buy right now

Specifications

Dimensions: 1141.7 x 87 x 115.7mm (W x H x D)
Speaker configuration: 5.0.2
Claimed audio power: N/A
Connections: HDMI input (ARC), optical digital audio to HDMI converter, Bluetooth, Ethernet port, 802.11b,g Wi-Fi, Apple AirPlay 2, IR receiver

Reasons to buy

+
Dolby Atmos, TrueHD and Dolby Digital Plus
+
Discrete all-in-one soundbar
+
Amazing surround sound and music playback

Reasons to avoid

-
Doesn’t suit every room

Sonos latest surround sound solution is contained entirely in a single soundbar it calls Arc. 

While we’re not sure if the device gets its name from the HDMI interface it uses, the curved sound it pitches or the fact that it is perhaps, metaphorically, a vessel delivering impressive surround sound to the modern minimalist home, this system is hell-bent on short circuiting the surround sound game.

The Sonos Arc draws on Dolby’s latest TrueHD and Dolby Digital Plus sound codecs to deliver the best quality lossless audio found on cutting edge Blu-ray disks and some of the leading streaming services. It then enhances the 3D soundscape using Dolby Atmos object tracks to bounce certain sounds off the walls around you so they feel like they’re coming at you from all angles.

While all this might sound complicated, the Sonos Arc setup couldn’t be simpler, involving just a couple of steps on the smartphone app. The minimalist cable connections and all-in-one system construction add to this no-fuss feeling and streamlined aesthetic – making it the best soundbar you can buy in 2021.

Read more: Sonos Arc review

Sony HT-G700 soundbar in living room

(Image credit: Sony)
The best affordable Dolby Atmos soundbar with a subwoofer

Specifications

Dimensions: Soundbar: 980 x 64 x 108mm (W x H x D); Subwoofer: 192 x 387 x 406 mm
Speaker configuration: 3.1
Claimed audio power: 400W
Connections: HDMI eARC x 1, HDMI input x 1, optical digital x 1, Bluetooth

Reasons to buy

+
Impressively wide and tall sound
+
Dolby Atmos & DTS:X support
+
4K HDR HDMI passthrough

Reasons to avoid

-
Can't manage true height
-
Not as dynamic as higher priced options

We think the Sony HT-G700 hits an excellent sweet spot for features, price and the scale of its sound. It's a soundbar and wireless subwoofer combo, and the soundbar is a good size for TVs of 48 inches and up.

As we've come to expect from Sony there's more to this soundbar than just stereo, as good as that is. It supports both the Dolby Atmos and DTS:X elite surround sound formats (which is not something guaranteed in even more high-end soundbars), and Sony uses its excellent sound processing and acoustic wizardry to create a real wall of sound that stretches way beyond the limits of your TV screen, but with convincing positioning and direction of specific sounds. It might not be quite as good as the Sonos, but it's definitely up there.

Sony hasn't forgotten about the basics, though. The subwoofer gives it depth in bass that something like the Sonos Arc can't match on its own, and speech is really clear even in busy action soundtracks – and that's without the speech-boosting mode turned on.

Downsides? There aren't any dedicated upfiring channels, so we found the Atmos performance a little lacking compared to our Sony AV amp with its dedicated Atmos speakers. And if we're being really picky we'd say that it's also slightly less dynamic for sudden explosions and swelling soundtracks than the likes of the Sonos Arc or Samsung HW-Q800A – but it's a lot cheaper than either. So for the price, it's the most cinematic experience you can get.

Read more: Sony HT-G700 review

Sonos Ray on glass shelf in living room

(Image credit: Future)
The best cheap soundbar, if you're happy without HDMI

Specifications

Dimensions: 559 x 71 x 95 (w x h x d)
Speaker configuration: 3.0
Claimed audio power: Not listed
Connections: 1x optical digital, Ethernet

Reasons to buy

+
Big, balanced sound
+
Remote control learning part of setup
+
Good with music as well

Reasons to avoid

-
No HDMI ARC option
-
More narrow sound
-
Sounds best for iPhone users

Sonos impresses at the cheaper end as well as the higher end, with the Ray – its smallest and least-expensive soundbar. The sound is an immediate and clear upgrade for the older or cheaper TVs that it's aimed at – we tested it with a mid-range Sony set from a few years ago, and the dialog was clearer, movie scores had more life and drama, and it even delivers a good amount of bass for impactful explosions in action movies. Compared to built-in speakers of the 32- to 50-inch TVs it's aimed at, there's no competition; it's a huge improvement.

Of course, it's not as strong as the larger soundbars here. It doesn't offer the expansive width and height to audio that the Sony HT-G700 above does, nor is it as good with positioning sounds precisely in space. And it's simply less dynamic overall.

But that's okay, because it's not made for people who are reaching for the most cinematic experience they can get. It's made for people who just want bigger and fuller movie sound, with more understandable speech. And it's a full Sonos wireless speaker, so it's much better with music than most soundbars, including the Sony HT-G700.

One thing to know is that it only uses optical digital for its connection – no HDMI ARC. This means it may need to learn your remote control's signals before it works, but Sonos has made that part of the setup process, so it's pretty much foolproof.

Read the full review: Sonos Ray

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Samsung HW-Q950A complete with speakers, soundbar and subwoofer

(Image credit: Future)
The best soundbar for total Dolby Atmos immersion

Specifications

Dimensions: Main soundbar - 1232 x 69.5 x 138mm/Subwoofer 210 x 403 x 403mm/Rear - 125 x 203 x 141 (W x H x D)
Speaker configuration: 11.1.4
Claimed audio power: 616W
Connections: Two HDMI inputs, one HDMI output with eARC, optical digital-audio input, USB port, Bluetooth / Wi-Fi

Reasons to buy

+
Hugely powerful movie playback
+
Remarkably well-rounded Dolby Atmos soundstage
+
Dolby Vision and HDR10+ passthrough

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive compared to rivals
-
A little unrefined with music

Samsung’s HW-Q950A soundbar hits the ground running by delivering no less than 16 separate channels of sound. It sounds particularly amazing when it comes to watching your favorite movies, delivering a remarkably well-rounded Dolby Atmos soundstage. As we said in our Samsung HW-Q950A review, it's all kinds of awesome.

The 2020 model was already pretty impressive with 14 channels, but the HW-950A is even better. This is the most immersive Dolby Atmos performance we've ever heard from a soundbar. When we tested it with fast-paced action scenes it didn't miss a beat, even when it was thumping out the hardest impact sounds. Polite? No. Enormous fun? Oh yes. 

Our only real disappointment here is its slightly less impressive music playback. At this price we expected it to have the wow factor, but it's just quite good. It's definitely been made with movies and gaming in mind rather than music. That's not to say its musical performance is bad. But we've heard better, so if you're swithering between this and a decent separates system instead, if music is your priority then separates may be the better option. But if you're more into movies, you can't really beat the power, performance and convenience of Samsung's soundbar.

Read more: Samsung HW-Q950A review

Samsung HW-Q800A resting on a table in a home theater setup

(Image credit: Future)
The best soundbar for mid-range cinematic thrills

Specifications

Dimensions: Main soundbar 980 x 60 x 115mm / Subwoofer 403 x 210 x 403mm (W x H x D)
Speaker configuration: 3.1.2
Claimed audio power: 330W
Connections: HDMI input and output with eARC, optical digital audio input, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful, immersive, room-filling sound
+
Excellent bass support from the subwoofer

Reasons to avoid

-
Some features only available with newer Samsung TVs

Don't have space for rear speakers and don't want to spend too much money? The Samsung Q800A is a superb package for getting Dolby Atmos sound that you can really feel without putting a big dent in your wallet. It's not too big either – we'd recommend it for TVs of 48 inches and up.

One of the reasons we like this soundbar so much is because it has actual upfiring drivers. That means it can deliver more convincing Atmos height than soundbars without upfiring speakers, and we found that the horizontal sound stage was nice and wide too. Add in some impressively meaty bass and you've got the ideal home entertainment experience without having to fill your room with hardware.

There are some useful tricks for new Samsung TV owners too: you can combine it with the sound optimization features of the new Q70A or higher Samsung TVs, enabling you to get an even bigger and clearer sound. 

Don't worry if you don't have those TVs, though: we think the Q800A is more than good enough to stand on its own.  It provides you with room filling sound that's wonderfully immersive. It's precise, powerful, and dynamic enough to ensure that you feel the full weight of every one of its available 3.1.2 channels. And as an added bonus, you can add wireless rear speakers later if you're ready to upgrade.

Read more: Samsung HW-Q800A review

Sonos Beam gen 2 on TV stand

(Image credit: Sonos)
The best small soundbar – great Dolby Atmos for 32 inches and up

Specifications

Dimensions: 69 x 651 x 100mm
Speaker configuration: 3.1.2
Claimed audio power: N/A
Connections: HDMI input (ARC), optical digital audio to HDMI converter, Bluetooth, Ethernet port, 802.11b,g Wi-Fi, Apple AirPlay 2, IR receiver

Reasons to buy

+
Wide soundstage with Dolby Atmos
+
HDMI eARC support
+
Hi-res audio compatibility

Reasons to avoid

-
No upfiring drivers
-
No HDMI passthrough

If you're tight on space, the Sonos Beam (Gen 2) is the best soundbar you can buy. Its compact size means it will easily slot beneath your TV, whether you pop it on a TV stand or mount it to your wall, and a sleek design means it won't look out of place with your decor. It's compact enough to work with 32-inch TVs (just about), but it's a perfect fit with 40-inch TVs up to 50-inch TVs.

It improves on the company’s original Sonos Beam soundbar with virtual Dolby Atmos, HDMI eARC compatibility, and a refreshed design. 

While it doesn't have the upfiring tweeters necessary for 'true' Dolby Atmos (and as a result, we found the sonic height isn't as impressive as the Sonos Arc), the Sonos Beam (Gen 2) boasts a wide soundstage and an immersive audio performance. It's very detailed, impressively dynamic for switching between loud and quiet suddenly, and is just as good with music as it is with movies.

In fact, you can stream music to it over Wi-Fi (AirPlay 2 or Sonos' own wireless system), and it works as a smart speaker – it has Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant built in (you can choose which).

Read more: Sonos Beam (Gen 2) review

the panorama 3 soundbar beneath a tv

(Image credit: TechRadar)
An excellent rival for the Sonos Arc

Specifications

Dimensions: 65 x 1210 x 140mm
Speaker configuration: 3.1.2
Claimed audio power: 400W
Connections: 1 x HDMI eARC 1 x Digital Audio In (Toslink) 1 x RJ45 Ethernet 1 x USB-C (service connection only)

Reasons to buy

+
Precise and engrossing sound with movies
+
Genuinely adept with music
+
Nice selection of control options

Reasons to avoid

-
Dolby Atmos could be more effective

If you're looking for a convincing alternative to the Sonos Arc at a similar price, we'd recommend the Bowers & Wilkins Panorama 3. It's a great choice. 

This sleek-looking soundbar offers 3.1.2-channels of cinematic sound, Dolby Atmos support, and lots of control options including a touch-sensitive panel on the bar itself. 

In our tests, the Panorama 3 was engrossing, punchy and dynamic without sacrificing the natural and coherent sound Bowers is known for. The soundstage is wide and spacious, although we felt the Dolby Atmos feature could be more convincing; we didn't get the same sense of height that you'd get from Sennheiser's Ambeo soundbar or a pair of overhead speakers. 

Still, the Atmos performance does make the sound more three-dimensional and the soundbar sounds just as good for music as it does for movies. With Spotify Connect, AirPlay 2, and Bluetooth (with aptX Adaptive), you've got plenty of connectivity options, too. Unfortunately there's no HDMI passthrough, but that's a small bugbear for a soundbar that's otherwise so feature-rich.

You'll be able to hook the Panorama 3 up to a multiroom system with Bowers & Wilkins Zeppelin, Formation, or other Panorama speakers - but this feature is coming via a software update, so we weren't able to test that particular feature for ourselves. 

Read more: Bowers & Wilkins Panorama 3 review

the sony ht-a7000 soundbar below a TV in a stylish living room

(Image credit: Sony)
Sony’s newest flagship is a big ‘bar for big bucks

Specifications

Speaker configuration: 7.1.2
Claimed audio power: 500W
Connections: HDMI eARC / ARC, Optical In, USB, Bluetooth

Reasons to buy

+
Supremely clear dialogue
+
Two HDMI 2.1 ports
+
Atmos, DTS: X and 360 Reality Audio

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited height channels

The Sony HT-A7000 may have a massive sticker price, but it promises a long shelf life thanks to its two HDMI 2.1 ports and support for all the major spatial audio formats.

At this price we wish it came with the surround and subwoofer units, but those with incredibly deep pockets can tack those on for a few hundred more. 

What helps make the price tag feel a little more justified is the fact that the HT-A7000  comes with upfiring drivers for true Dolby Atmos, although we felt the height channels could be a little more convincing. 

In terms of musicality, though, the HT-A7000 is a very talented soundbar, with excellent stereo imaging and a really room-filling sound - especially if you take advantage of its support for Sony's 360 Reality Audio.

Connectivity is very good, too. The soundbar supports HDMI, of course, but it also has 3.5mm auxiliary, Bluetooth audio, USB devices, Spotify, Chromecast, Amazon Alexa and 360 Reality Audio via Deezer, Tidal and Amazon Music. That's a very wide selection of sources, giving you lots of flexibility in terms of what you want to connect. 

Read more: Sony HT-A7000 Dolby Atmos soundbar review

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polk audio command bar on wooden table with TV

(Image credit: TechRadar)
The best soundbar for Amazon devotees

Specifications

Dimensions: 43 x 14.5 x 14.4 inches
Speaker configuration: 2.1
Power: N/A
Connectivity: 1 x SPDIDF, 1 x HDMI, 1 x TOSLINK, 1 x micro-USB, 1 x HDMI output with Audio Return Channel (ARC), Bluetooth

Reasons to buy

+
Alexa built-in
+
Space for a Fire TV stick
+
Inexpensive

Reasons to avoid

-
Audio isn't as strong as newer competition

If you can spare $300 for a smart soundbar, then we highly recommend the Polk Audio Command Bar. It's a great little soundbar for any small or medium-sized living room. This is very much an Amazon device, with built-in Alexa and space for a Fire TV Stick. It's really affordable, coming in at $250 (£249 / AU$649), and that price includes a decent subwoofer. That means you're getting a defined and powerful low end, some cool smart features and pretty good looks too.

We'd have liked the audio to be a little more punchy but at this price we can't really complain: that subwoofer is more than capable of pumping out enough volume for immersive movie situations and we found it more than capable of floor-filling bass at parties too.

The Command Bar may not be the newest kid in audio town any more but it has some useful features that make it stand out from the rest, it's easy to set up and it's well priced too.

Read more: Polk Audio Command Bar review

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denon Home sound bar 550 with TV

(Image credit: Denon)
The best smaller soundbar for bigger, bolder sound

Specifications

Dimensions: 650 x 75 x 120mm
Speaker configuration: 4.0
Claimed audio power: N/A
Connections: 4K HDMI (1 X in / 1 x out with eARC), 1 x digital optical, USB port, 3.55mm aux input

Reasons to buy

+
Well specified and flexible
+
Poised, large-scale sound (at reasonable volumes)
+
Nicely made and finished

Reasons to avoid

-
Becomes socially aggressive at higher volumes
-
Dolby Atmos effect is lacking

There are many big, expensive Dolby Atmos soundbars to choose from, and plenty inexpensive, smaller soundbars for upgrading your TV. The Denon Home Sound Bar 550 sits somewhere in the middle, bringing you Dolby Atmos-style audio thrills in a smaller form factor.

It’s a compact, well-specified soundbar whose looks are quite understated but its sound is anything but. Offering plenty of connectivity options, great (including hi-res audio ability and some processing wizardry to deliver a sense of spatial audio) and a genuine facility as a music speaker.

We found the sound the Denon serves up is tall and quite wide, which makes for an engrossing and entertaining listen. However, we also found that this isn't a soundbar that wants to go too loud: turn it up too much and things quickly get out of hand, with the Home 550 baring its teeth and becoming overly aggressive. 

Read more: Denon Home Sound Bar 550 review

How to buy the best soundbar for you

If you love the slim aesthetic of your new 4K TV, we can bet it doesn’t have the audio needed to match the visuals. That means picking the best soundbar to go with your TV is your best option to get the most out of your favorite TV shows and films. 

The best soundbars of 2022 are built to be just as pleasing to the eye as they are to the ear. Most of them are sleek, minimal and designed to sit flush against a wall or home cinema set-up. They're also a good solution for smaller homes and rooms with little space that wouldn't be able to squeeze a 7.1 channel speaker system in. 

The majority of the soundbars on this list are made to sit in front of your screen, but they can also be wall-mounted above or to the side of it as well, depending on how your room is laid out. This provides you with ultimate choice as to how your home entertainment set-up looks.

Despite most of the soundbars on this list only featuring front-facing speakers, many are able to confidently project sound in a way that makes it seem as though there's booming audio coming from every direction.

If you're looking for an alternative solution to a soundbar, check out the Sony HT-A9 Home Theater System. It comprises four speakers that communicate with each other wirelessly via a tiny box that's slightly larger than an Apple TV, working together to create a further 12 "phantom" Dolby Atmos speakers. 

If you have an iPhone or an iPad, you should also take a look at our guide to the best AirPlay speakers. These allow you to stream music directly from your devices to your speaker. That means room-filling sound from your phone without the need for a more complex entertainment set-up. Some are small and portable, but plenty of soundbars come with AirPlay integration baked in too. 

Are soundbars worth it?

Absolutely. Even if you don't consider yourself a hardcore cinephile, the best soundbars make a world of difference to your TV watching experience – built-in TV speakers just don't do your favorite films, TV shows, and games justice. 

How much should I spend on a soundbar?

It really depends on what you're looking for. If you want the very best soundbar technology has to offer, you might be looking at prices of AED 4,000 / SAR 4,500 and upwards. However, there are lots of budget soundbars on the market, with some costing less than AED 500. Just bear in mind that you generally get what you pay for, and these budget models probably won't come with premium features like Dolby Atmos, included rear speakers, and hi-res audio support. 

Where should I put a soundbar?

You generally have two options when it comes to soundbar placement: wall-mounting it, or placing in below your TV on your TV cabinet. If your soundbar is quite tall, wall-mounting may be the best option, as it could obscure the IR receiver on your TV, rendering your remote control useless.

TechRadar Middle East