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Best camera in the UAE for 2021: the top cameras you can buy right now

PRICE
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID

Included in this guide:

Sony A1
(Image credit: Future)

Searching for the best camera you can buy in the UAE in 2021? There's never been more choice when it comes to digital cameras, but this can also make things overwhelming when it comes to picking the right one. But fear not, that's where our extensive guide to the best cameras for photography and video comes in. 

Whether you're keen on a mirrorless camera, DSLR or action camera, we've tested them all to bring the definitive guide that will help you make the right decision. We regularly update this guide with our latest reviews, so you can be sure that it's stuffed to the brim with up-to-date advice. We've even got a useful 'coming soon' section for anybody thinking about new releases that are on the horizon.

Picking out the best camera from your shortlist will depend on many factors. One of the big ones is, of course, budget. For that reason, our list features options that range from beginner DSLRs, going all the way up to high-end professional-level mirrorless models.

If you look at our list below, you'll likely be struck at the variety of shapes and sizes on display. Cameras such as the Fujifilm X100V, for example, are light and portable models that are ideal for street photography, if not necessarily versatile. By contrast, the full-frame Nikon Z7 II is an ideal choice for hobbyist photographers offering both speedy performance and excellent handling.

For those who want to take their photography up a notch from their smartphone, there's never been a better time to upgrade to a 'proper' digital camera either. There's some excellent enthusiast level all-rounder models currently on the market such as the Fujifilm X-S10 and the Nikon Z50. Both are versatile, travel-friendly and are available at great prices. 

Those with a little more experience might be drawn towards full-frame models such as the Canon EOS R6 or Nikon Z6 II. If you're somebody who wants the best of the best, then the Sony A1 is probably the best mirrorless camera ever made – but it's expensive overkill for most photographers.

That leaves us with us a set of cameras which have earned their place in our list for a specific reason. It could be that they offer top-end performance, fantastic handling or they just represent great value for money. You'll find stills-focused pro models alongside vlogging options, with each camera here being the best in its given class.

Although it's very hard to pick an overall best camera, our pick right now is the Fujifilm X-T4. It's powerful, versatile and distinctive, three qualities that make it the best hybrid camera for photography and video on the market. That's not to say it's definitely for you though, especially if you're already tied into another system with lenses. Another great pick is the Sony A7 III for example, which although slightly older offers fantastic value for money.

Our guide below is worth studying to help you find the camera that matches your shooting needs. Each entry we know is a great performer, so now it's up to you to choose a budget and find one which suits your needs.

  • Having a good camera can be as easy as owning a phone. You can check out our list of best camera phones to find a good smartphone option instead of a camera.

Coming soon...

Concerned about camera launches that just around the corner? While the arrival of new models won't instantly make our recommendations below any worse, it's always good to know you're investing in the best camera at the right time. So here's a short guide to the latest confirmed camera launches for 2021.

Two major 'development announcements' we've heard recently are for the Canon EOS R3 and Nikon Z9, which are both high-end, professional mirrorless cameras for sports photographers. For the vast majority of photographers, these will be overkill, but it'll be fascinating to see what treats they do deliver when they both launch later in 2021. 

We were also recently treated to a development announcement of the Panasonic GH6, which will primarily be of interest to those concerned with video. Before that makes its way on to the market at the end of 2021, we'll also have the GH5 Mark II, a slight upgrade from the GH5 which now includes livestreaming capabilities.

Beyond those, there are only rumors of a Nikon Z30 (expected to be a hobbyist mirrorless camera), Fujifilm GFX50S (likely to be a medium format camera) and Sony A7 IV. But given those remain just speculation right now, they shouldn't factor too much in your buying decision right now. As of today, these are the best cameras you can buy, and they're all cracking options in their genres...

The best cameras in the UAE for 2021:

Front-on shot of the Fujifilm X-T4, the best camera on the market

(Image credit: Future)

The best all-round camera you can buy

Specifications
Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 26.1MP
Viewfinder: 3,690K dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 1,620K dots
Autofocus: 425-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 15fps (mechanical shutter), 30fps (electronic)
Movies: 4K at 60p
User level: Intermediate
Reasons to buy
+Superb image quality+IBIS a big bonus for video
Reasons to avoid
-No headphone jack-Video recording limit

Looking for a hybrid camera that's just as capable at shooting video as it is stills? The Fujifilm X-T4 is the best option around. It's the finest APS-C camera we've ever tested and builds on the Fujifilm X-T3's impressive foundation by adding in-body image stabilization (IBIS), faster burst shooting and some successful design tweaks. Adding to its all-rounder skills are a bigger battery (which keeps it going for 500 shots per charge) and some improved autofocus, which is fast and reliable in most scenarios. Its 26MP APS-C sensor remains class-leading for stills, but the X-T4's real trump card is its performance as a video camera. The IBIS is a huge bonus here, and the X-T4 backs that up with a huge range of tools and a great shooting experience, including a fully articulating touchscreen. It might cost the same as many full-frame cameras, but the X-T4 and its fine range of X-series lenses make a great, smaller alternative for those looking for a mirrorless all-rounder.  

The Canon EOS R6 on a wall with the 24-240mm lens

(Image credit: TechRadar)

A superb camera with best-in-class features

Specifications
Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 20.1MP
Viewfinder: 3,690K dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 1,620K dots
Autofocus: 6,072-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 12fps (mechanical shutter), 20fps (electronic)
Movies: 4K at 60p
User level: Professional
Reasons to buy
+Class-leading autofocus+Excellent full-frame IBIS+Dual card slots
Reasons to avoid
-Currently expensive-Video recording limits

While the Canon EOS R5 is overkill for most people, the EOS R6 is a more affordable full-frame alternative that is simply one of the best cameras you can buy today. If you already own one of Canon's early mirrorless full-framers like the EOS R, or any of its DSLRs, this is a more than worthy upgrade. The EOS R6 brings best-in-class autofocus, a superb in-body image stabilization system, and burst shooting powers that mark it out as a very fine camera for wildlife or sports photography. Despite its ability to shoot 4K/60p video, the EOS R6 lacks options like the ability to DCI 4K and has overheating limitations compared to rivals like the Sony A7S III, making it better suited to stills photographers. But for the latter, it's an excellent (if pricey) option that delivers hugely impressive autofocus, handling and features that make it one of the best options around for anyone looking to move into full-frame photography. 

The Nikon Z6 II on table with the Z 50mm f/1.8 lens

(Image credit: Future)

No longer the mirrorless king, but not far behind

Specifications
Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 24.5MP
Viewfinder: 3,690K dots
Monitor: 3.2-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 2,100K dots
Autofocus: 273-point hybrid AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 14fps
Movies: 4K at 30p
User level: Intermediate/expert
Reasons to buy
+Excellent image quality+Great handling
Reasons to avoid
-Not the most advanced AF-Screen isn't vari-angle

The aging Nikon Z6 reigned as our number one camera for a long time – and while its Z6 II is only a modest successor, both cameras should definitely be on your shortlist if you're looking for a full-frame sidekick. The Z6 continues to offer great value and the best handling around, but we think the Z6 II is just about worth the extra cost if you can afford it. Its additional EXPEED 6 processor brings a host of improvements, including new 14fps burst mode (up from 12fps on the Z6) and some handy autofocus boosts (particularly for animal eye/face detection). You also get an extra UHS-II card slot, which joins the existing XQD/CFexpress slot, and a firmware update will bring a new 4K/60p video mode in February 2021. It's a shame there's a slight wait for the latter, but otherwise the Z6 II nicely updates the Z6's very solid foundation. The 24MP full-frame BSI CMOS sensor performs well at high ISOs, and the Z6 II has class-leading build quality that feels more substantial than its rivals. 

Fujifilm X-S10

The Fujifilm X-S10 on a wall with the 18-55mm kit lens. (Image credit: Future)

This versatile little all-rounder hits the sweet spot

Specifications
Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 26.1MP
Viewfinder: 2.36m dots
Monitor: 3-inch articulating touchscreen, 1.04m dots
Autofocus: 425-point hybrid AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8fps (mechanical), 20fps (electronic shutter)
Movies: 4K at 30p
User level: Beginner/intermediate
Reasons to buy
+Superb image and video quality+IBIS in a small body+Excellent handling
Reasons to avoid
-Not weather-proof

It's hard to think of another camera that offers the same blend of size, performance affordability and charm as the Fujifilm X-S10. For both hobbyists and pros looking for a small second body, it's an excellent option that covers all the bases for stills and video. You get a tried-and-tested 26.1MP APS-C sensor (the same as the one in the Fujifilm X-T4, see above) and, impressively for a camera this small, in-body image stabilization (IBIS). This feature, which helps you preserve image quality while shooting handheld, can also be found in some small Sony and Olympus cameras, but none of those offer the X-S10's excellent handling or range of features. It has a handy vari-angle screen, great build quality, and shoots impressive 4K video, too. Pair it with a prime lens and you have a fine travel or street camera – thanks to X-S10's large grip, though, it'll also match nicely with longer lenses as well.

Angled photo of the Sony A7 III on a table

Still one of the best full-frame cameras around

Specifications
Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 24.2MP
Viewfinder: 2,359K dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 921K dots
Autofocus: 693-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 10fps
Movies: 4K at 30p
User level: Intermediate/expert
Reasons to buy
+Great 24MP sensor+Sensor-based stabilization
Reasons to avoid
-Weather-sealing could be better -Some EVF tearing

Despite its age, we still love the A7 III. The core of the camera – namely a 24MP full-frame sensor, 4K video, sensor-based image stabilization, 10fps burst shooting and a 693-point hybrid AF system – remains very competitive, but with two card slots and a 710-shot battery life on top of that, you're getting excellent value for money alongside top performance. Some firmware updates have further refined its AF performance, bringing treats like real-time Eye AF for animals, and there's now a huge range of lenses to choose from. We have some slight reservations about the viewfinder and weather-sealing, but the A7 III is still one of the most versatile cameras around – and it's never offered better value either.

Hands holding the Nikon Z7 II with its Z 85mm f/1.8 lens.

(Image credit: Future)

A subtle but excellent evolution of the Nikon Z7

Specifications
Sensor: Full-frame CMOS
Megapixels: 45.7MP
Autofocus: 493-point AF
Screen type: 3.2-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 2,100K dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Movies: 4K at 60p
User level: Enthusiast
Reasons to buy
+Superb handling+Speedier performance than Z7
Reasons to avoid
-Relatively modest update of Z7-Rivals have superior action AF

It's not a huge leap forward from the Nikon Z7, but then the Z7 II didn't really need to be. With a blend of subtle but important upgrades, including improved autofocus and a deeper buffer, this full-frame mirrorless camera is a very fine choice – particularly if you're making the move from an older Nikon DSLR. The Z7 II combines Nikon's signature handling with an excellent 45.7MP full-frame sensor, which is the same as the one we loved in its predecessor. This means you get class-leading dynamic range, sharp edge-to-edge detail and a handy 19MP APS-C crop mode, for sports or wildlife shooting. Some rivals may offer more in the way of video features and autofocus performance (for action shots in particular), but the Nikon Z7 II brings internal 4K/60p video and remains one of the best full-frame cameras you can buy today. With the Z system's lens collection also growing this year, now is the time to make the switch from your DSLR.

The Nikon Z50 sitting on tree trunk with its kit lens.

(Image credit: Future)

The perfect mid-range mirrorless upgrade for DSLR owners

Specifications
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 20.9MP
Lens: Z-mount
Screen type: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,036,080 dots
Viewfinder: EVF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 11fps
Movies: 4K
User level: Enthusiast
Reasons to buy
+Great, DSLR-style handling+Excellent viewfinder and screen
Reasons to avoid
-Limited range of native lenses-Tilt-screen can't be used with tripod

Looking for a smaller, more affordable version of the full-frame Nikon Z6 for travel and general shooting? The Z50 fits the bill and is an excellent entry into mid-range, APS-C cameras from Nikon. It's particularly suitable for those looking to move to mirrorless from a Nikon DSLR as, unlike more petite rivals like the Fujifilm X-T30, it prioritizes handling thanks to its large, deep grip. The Z50 produces great photos and has the same excellent autofocus system as the Nikon Z6, which works very well for static subjects, but can't quite match the performance of something like the Sony A6400 when it comes to sports and action. With an impressive viewfinder and tilting touchscreen, though, the Z50 is a great camera for photography, and is compatible with older F-mount lenses via an optional adaptor, along with Nikon's new Z-Mount glass. If you like retro styling you might want to check out the Nikon Zfc, but otherwise this remains an excellent (and more affordable) choice.

The Fujifilm X100V compact camera in front of flower pots.

(Image credit: Future)

An iconic compact returns, now with improved performance

Specifications
Type: Premium compact
Sensor: APS-C X-Trans CMOS
Resolution: 26.1MP
Lens: 23mm, f/2
Viewfinder: Hybrid EVF
Screen type: 3.0-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 1.62m dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 11fps
Movies: 4K
User level: Beginner/enthusiast
Reasons to buy
+Tilting touchscreen+Improved sensor and autofocus+4K video
Reasons to avoid
-Needs filter for full weather-sealing-Expensive

On paper, the Fujifilm X100V shouldn’t make sense: a compact camera styled like something from the 1950s, with a fixed 23mm f/2 lens and a premium price tag. Yet the model’s predecessors have become iconic among photographers – and the X100V looks set to follow suit. Understated and timeless, there’s something very special about that compact retro body. 

The X100V keeps what works, only tweaking what it needs to: there's now a very handy tilting touchscreen and a weather-resistant body (although you need to add a filter to the lens to get full weather-sealing). The series’ fixed aperture lens setup has always been fantastic for street and portrait photography, and results are only better now that Fujifilm’s added a new 26.1MP APS-C sensor paired with the latest X-Processor 4. Autofocus is faster, noise control better and image quality improved. The hybrid EVF – both optical and electronic – packs a higher-resolution, too.

Add a quicker continuous shooting rate and 4K video into the mix and you’ve got one very desirable compact. Sure, it’s niche and certainly not cheap, but there’s nothing else quite like it.

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV mounted on a tripod in a garden.

(Image credit: Future)

One of the best mirrorless cameras around for beginners

Specifications
Sensor size: Micro Four Thirds
Resolution: 20.3MP
Viewfinder: 2,360K dots
Monitor: 3-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,037K dots
Autofocus: 121-point Contrast Detection AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 15fps
Movies: 4K at 30p
User level: Beginner
Reasons to buy
+Good sensor+Compact body+Useful image stabilization
Reasons to avoid
-No microphone input-No USB-C port

Looking for compact mirrorless camera to help develop your photographic skills? The OM-D E-M10 Mark IV is one of the best options around and offers great value considering its feature set.

A useful flip-down touchscreen and good ergonomics make it a fine option for beginners who are moving up from a smartphone or compact camera. And because the E-M10 Mark IV is a Micro Four Thirds camera, it has one of the biggest selections of lenses around, which means it's a model that can really grow with you. 

On the downside, it lacks a microphone or USB-C ports, and the autofocus lags a little behind rivals like the Sony A6100 (see below). So while that camera is a better bet for sports or action shooting, the E-M10 Mark IV is a more fun camera to use and is one of the few at this price point to bring in-body image stabilization, a very handy bonus for handheld shooting.

The Sony A6100 camera sat on a table with the 16-70mm lens.

(Image credit: Future)

A fine mirrorless camera for beginners and hobbyists alike

Specifications
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 24.2MP
Lens: Sony E-mount
Viewfinder: EVF
Screen type: 2.95-inch tilting touchscreen, 921,600 dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 11fps (mechanical)
Movies: 4K
User level: Beginner
Reasons to buy
+Excellent tracking autofocus+Compact yet feature-packed
Reasons to avoid
-Takes time to understand capabilities-Relatively low-res LCD and EVF

Since its launch five years ago, the entry-level Sony A6000 has proven a hugely popular mirrorless camera. Its successor, the A6100, takes the existing recipe and adds several tweaks that help it compete with today’s mirrorless pack. Compact yet capable, the A6100 pairs a beginner-friendly build with a feature set that won’t disappoint the more adventurous. It can take time to understand the camera’s potential, but there’s plenty of it: the APS-C sensor is the same 24.2MP chip found in Sony’s more premium cameras, while the autofocus system is shared with the flagship Sony A6600. The result is excellent continuous tracking abilities and, paired with a good lens, images with plenty of detail and generally accurate colors. Battery life is also decent and the tilting screen is now touch-sensitive, though its functionality is fairly limited. Certain performance and handling quirks are shared with its more expensive siblings – Auto ISO doesn’t suit fast-moving subjects, for example – but these are more forgivable on an entry-level model, especially such a solid all-rounder as the A6100. It deserves to be just as popular as its predecessor.

Hands holding the Nikon D3500 with its kit lens.

The best beginner-friendly DSLR you can buy

Specifications
Type: DSLR
Sensor: APS-C CMOS, 24.2MP
Lens mount: Nikon F
Screen: 3-inch, 921K dots
Viewfinder: Optical
Continuous shooting: 5fps
Movies: 1080p
User level: Beginner
Reasons to buy
+Huge battery life+Massive lens selection available
Reasons to avoid
-No 4K video-Screen not touch-sensitive

This list is dominated by mirrorless cameras, but if you still prefer the benefits of DSLRS – namely, their handling, superior battery lives and value – then the Nikon D3500 is the best one around for beginners looking to get started in photography. Taking the baton from the hugely successful Nikon D3400, it brings a 24MP APS-C sensor and an incredible 1,550-shot battery life that beats the stamina of most mirrorless cameras by about three times. The useful Guide mode is there to walk beginners through creating effects like a blurred background, while the Nikon DX system has a vast array of lenses. If you're starting out, we'd recommend buying the D3500 with the AF-P DX 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR lens, as its brings handy vibration reduction for very little extra cost. Those looking for a travel-friendly camera should still consider mirrorless alternatives like the Fujifilm X-T200 and Canon EOS M50, but otherwise this remains a brilliant way to learn the photographic basics and start your new hobby.

The Sony A7S III mirrorless camera sat on a wooden table.

(Image credit: Future)

The best mirrorless video camera you can buy

Specifications
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 12.1MP
Lens: Sony E
Viewfinder: 9.44MP EVF
Monitor: 1.44m-dot articulating screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Movies: 4K at 120fps
User level: Intermediate / expert
Reasons to buy
+Fantastic low light quality+Fully articulating touchscreen+Good battery life
Reasons to avoid
-Pricey -Low-res for stills

For a long time it looked like the Sony A7S III was never going to arrive, but it was well worth the wait – if you're looking for a video-focused, full-frame hybrid camera, this is currently the best one you can buy. In fact, the only reason the A7S III isn't higher in this list is because of that pro-level price tag. If you can afford it and need a small, 4K camera that's extremely capable in low light, then you certainly won't be disappointed. Video quality is exceptional, and you can record for a very long time too – unlike the more limited Canon EOS R5, we didn't encounter any overheating warnings and were able to shoot for well beyond 30 minutes.

The A7S III is a pro camera packed with pro video features: the ability shoot 16-bit raw over its full-size HDMI port, excellent autofocus, a 9.44MP viewfinder and in-body image stabilization (IBIS) to help iron out those micro-jitters when shooting handheld. Naturally, you also get a headphone jack and 3.5mm microphone jack, plus the option of XLR audio and four audio inputs via the XLR-K3M hot-shoe accessory. If you don't demand high resolution stills, it's a more than capable camera for your photos, too. There's no doubt it's pricey, but the Sony A7S III is also the best camera in its class and takes mirrorless video to new heights.

The Sony ZV-1 mounted on a tripod outside with its microphone windshield

(Image credit: Future)

The best compact vlogging camera for YouTubers

Specifications
Type: Compact
Sensor size: 1-inch
Resolution: 20.1MP
Lens: 24-70mm f/1.8-2.8
Screen type: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 921,600 dots
Viewfinder: None
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 24fps
Movies: 4K/30p
User level: Beginner/Intermediate
Reasons to buy
+Class-leading autofocus+3.5mm mic port and hotshoe
Reasons to avoid
-Limited touchscreen-MicroUBS rather than USB-C

Looking for a compact vlogging camera for your YouTube channel? The Sony ZV-1 is the best around. Sony has smartly combined all of the best bits from its various RX100 series cameras, and added some handy design tweaks, to make the a near-perfect pocket camera for video shooters. Its best feature is the combination of a bright 24-70mm f/1.8-2.8 lens with Sony's Real-time tracking and Real-time Eye AF systems – together, these make it incredibly easy to shoot high-quality vlogs with attractive background blur and unerring focus. A 3.5mm microphone jack means you can also get audio quality that matches the ZV-1's video performance, while a hotshoe lets you mount accessories like a microphone or light without needing extra accessories like a bracket. Naturally, the battery life is pretty average and the stabilization isn't quite gimbal-smooth, but in every other respect this is the smartphone-beating camera vloggers have been waiting for.

Canon EOS R5 sitting on a wall with the 24-105mm lens.

(Image credit: Future)

The finest stills camera Canon has ever made

Specifications
Sensor: Full-frame CMOS
Megapixels: 45
Autofocus: 5,940-zone AF
Screen type: 3.15-inch tilting touchscreen, 2.1m-dots
Continuous shooting speed: 20fps
Movies: 8K
User level: Enthusiast / expert
Reasons to buy
+Superb autofocus+Solid IBIS system+Good battery life
Reasons to avoid
-High price-CFExpress cards can be costly-Some limitations for video

If you see the Canon EOS R5 as a pro stills camera with some impressive video features, then it's one of the best the photography giant has ever made. There's no doubt it has video limitations compared to a rival like the Sony A7S III, particularly for shooting longer clips. But for anyone looking to shoot mind-blowing stills in almost any situation, whether that's wildlife or studio work, it's a hugely impressive achievement. 

Particularly worth of mention is the EOS R5's autofocus, which offers very accurate and reliable subject-detection and tracking – particularly when its comes to people or animals. You also get a superb 5.76-million pixel EVF, a body design that will be comfortably familiar to those coming from DSLRs, and the ability to shoot bursts at 12fps with the mechanical shutter (or 20fps with the electronic equivalent). The video performance, while limited to relatively short bursts, remains superior to the likes of the Nikon Z7 and Sony A9 II, too. With a growing collection of (albeit pricey) RF lenses, the Canon EOS R5 is the next-gen mirrorless camera that pro photographers have been waiting for. 

The GoPro Hero 9 Black sitting on a tree branch showing its front-facing screen

(Image credit: Future)

The most versatile action camera we've ever seen

Specifications
Weight: 158g
Waterproof: 10m
4K video: up to 60fps
1080: up to 240fps
720: up to 240fps
Stills resolution: 20MP
Battery: 1720mAh
Reasons to buy
+5K video captures lots of detail+Front display for vlogging+Improved battery life+New software skills
Reasons to avoid
-Rear screen a little unresponsive-Little improvement to 4K video

If you're looking for a tough, waterproof backup camera that you can stick pretty much anywhere, then the Hero9 Black is the best option around right now. Its new front-facing LCD is a boon for vlogging, while its 5K video mode captures more detail than any other action camera. That said, it's all of the Hero 9 Black's little software tricks that really elevate it above the Hero 8 Black and DJI Osmo Action. Its HyperSmooth stabilization now works in any video resolution or frame-rate, while features like TimeWarp and HindSight (which lets you capture that happened 15-30 seconds before you hit the shutter) are genuinely useful creative tools. If you don't need the Hero 9 Black's versatility or front screen, then the Hero 8 Black remains better value. It also currently has issues like a slightly unresponsive rear touchscreen, which GoPro is promising to fix with firmware updates. But if you're looking for a brilliant B-camera, or a main camera for adventure sports, then it's hard to beat the Hero 9 Black.

Front shot of the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III on front of a Christmas tree

(Image credit: Future)

16. Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III

One of the best travel cameras you can buy today

Specifications
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: Four Thirds
Resolution: 20.4MP
Lens: Micro Four Thirds
Viewfinder: 2.36M-dot OLED EVF
Screen type: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 30fps
Movies: 4K
User level: Intermediate
Reasons to buy
+Incredible image stabilisation+Tiny body with excellent handling
Reasons to avoid
-Smaller sensor struggles in low light-Polycarbonate body feels like a downgrade

No camera can give you everything, but a rare few do come close – and the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III is in that class. Its polycarbonate shell might feel like a step down from the body of its predecessor, but in the hand this mirrorless snapper is Goldilocks stuff: just right. Lighter than ever and fantastic to handle, the Mark III backs up its good looks with a powerful processor, superlative image stabilization and shooting modes to suit every skill level and style of shooting.

There’s no escaping the fact that its Four Thirds sensor is behind the times on outright image quality, and there's now the slight issue of Olympus exiting the camera business. While this does put future servicing options in some doubt, we're still happy to recommend the OM-D E-M5 Mark III, as it'll remain a fantastic performer for years to come, regardless of its parent company's fate. Its combination of speed, style and sheer versatility make it a winner – add on-chip phase detection autofocus and 4K video chops to the mix and you’ve got yourself one of the best all-rounders on the market today.

Panasonic Lumix S5

Angled shot of the Panasonic Lumix S5 in front of a white wall. (Image credit: Future)

A compact full-framer and a superb hybrid camera

Specifications
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 24.2MP
Viewfinder: 2.36million dots
Screen type: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1.84m dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 7fps (mechanical shutter), 30fps (6K photo mode, 18MP)
Movies: 4K/60p 10-bit 4:2:0
User level: Intermediate/professional
Reasons to buy
+Small for a full-frame camera+Great video specs+Good range of controls
Reasons to avoid
-Not the best autofocus system-Not for sports photographers

Looking for a small full-frame camera that can help you shoot an even mix of high-quality video and still photos? The Panasonic Lumix S5 is one of the best options around. Smaller than the Panasonic Lumix GH5, which has a much smaller Four Thirds sensor, the S5 is particularly talented when it comes to shooting video, offering an uncropped 4K/30p mode and other high-end specs that include V-log recording and Dual Native ISO. With a pretty modest burst shooting rate of 7fps, it's not the best choice for sports or action photography, but its 6K photo mode (which lets you extract 18MP stills from video) compensates to an extent, and it otherwise offers impressive image quality and a much-improved autofocus performance. This feels like the camera Panasonic should have launched its S series with, and there are very few rivals at this price point that offer its blend of size, performance and video features.

Nikon Z5

The Nikon Z5 with the compact Z 24-50mm kit lens. (Image credit: Future)

The best entry-level full-frame camera you can buy right now

Specifications
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 24.3MP
Viewfinder: 3.69million dots
Screen type: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 1.04m dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 4.5fps
Movies: 4K/30p
User level: Beginner
Reasons to buy
+Excellent viewfinder+Very capable AF system+Comfy grip and solid build
Reasons to avoid
-Lacklustre burst rate-Cropped 4K video-Screen tilts only

Despite not being perfect, the Nikon Z5 is the best entry-level full-frame model you can buy right now, making it a great option for those looking to upgrade to the larger sensor for the first time. With a 24.3 megapixel sensor that reliably produces vibrant, sharp and clean images, a reliable autofocusing system and a comfy and well-built body, there's a lot to like about the Nikon Z5. Equipping it with the same high-resolution viewfinder as its more advanced Z6/Z7 brothers is a nice touch that adds a touch of premium quality to proceedings. What lets the Z5 down are things that some might not even be too bothered about - the 4.5fps maximum frame rate being underwhelming for action shooters, and the crop applied to 4K video being frustrating for vloggers. Neither of those things? Happy days. 

Honorary mention...

Top down shot of the Canon 1DX Mark III on a stone floor

(Image credit: Future)

A superlative performer with a price tag to match

Specifications
Type: DSLR
Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 20.1MP
Lens: EF mount
Viewfinder: Optical
Screen type: 3.2-inch fixed touchscreen, 2,100,000 dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 20fps
Movies: 4K
User level: Expert
Reasons to buy
+Super-fast and reliable+Innovative Smart Controllers+Deep-learning autofocus
Reasons to avoid
-No image stabilisation-Fixed LCD display-Expensive

If your budget matches the buffer of the Canon 1D X Mark III – practically unlimited – then it’s all the camera you’ll ever need. Canon’s latest full-frame DSLR is so feature-packed and powerful that, if it had four-wheels, it would probably beat a Ferrari.

As sturdy and sizable as the 1DX Mark II before it, the Mark III is 90g lighter and notably easier to control: the excellent new Smart Controller uses optical sensors to let you navigate focus points by swiping lightly with your thumb.

Driven by a new Digic X processing chip that’s three times quicker than that of its predecessor, the 1DX Mark III is also capable of capturing 4K footage at 50fps and achieving properly impressive continuous frame rates. 

Autofocus is unparalleled, too, thanks to deep learning smarts that ensure incredible precision in subject detection, while speeds will shame any mirrorless or DSLR rival, whether you use the optical viewfinder or fixed Live View touchscreen. In short, it’s a flagship in every sense – at least until the arrival of the Canon EOS R3 later this year.

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Mark Wilson

Mark is the Cameras Editor at TechRadar. Having worked in tech journalism for a ludicrous 17 years, Mark is now attempting to break the world record for the number of camera bags hoarded by one person. He was previously Cameras Editor at Trusted Reviews, Acting editor on Stuff.tv, as well as Features editor and Reviews editor on Stuff magazine. As a freelancer, he's contributed to titles including The Sunday Times, FourFourTwo and Arena. And in a former life, he also won the Daily Telegraph's Young Sportswriter of the Year. But that was before he discovered the strange joys of getting up at 4am for a photo shoot in London's Square Mile.